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11.09.2017 Boutique List updated 09.09.2017 2017 collection pages updated see Updates
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Moncler - The Story

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The origins of the name are in an abbreviation of Monastier de Clermont, a village in the mountains near Grenoble. At the outset, Moncler produced quilted sleeping bags, a single model of a lined hood and tents with a telescope structure and outside cover. The first quilted jackets were conceived for protecting workers from the cold. They used the jackets on top of their overalls in the small mountain establishment. The first to note them and realize their potential was the French mountaineer Lionel Terray. The result saw the specialist range "Moncler pour Lionel Terray": quilted jackets, overalls, gloves, and high resistance sleeping bags. Extreme protection made them suitable for the harshest climates. All were put to the test in the course of expeditions and were gradually perfected. In 1954, Moncler quilted jackets were chosen to equip the Italian expedition to Karakorum, which culminated with the conquest of the earth's second highest summit by Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli. Moncler also accompanied the French expedition which reached the summit of Makalù in 1995 and was the official supplier for expeditions in Alaska organised by Lionel Terray in 1964. On occasion of the Grenoble Winter Olympics, Moncler became the official supplier of the French national downhill skiing team. It was a special event that was also to mark the change in logo: Mount Eguit, which rises up behind the village, was replaced by the rooster. It was the French national downhill skiing team itself that requested a variation on the quilted jacket: it was no longer to be the double version but a single garment that would be more manageable, light and well-suited to competition requirements. Initially called "Huascaran" and then "Nepal", with the addition of leather epaulettes for resting the skis on without damaging the fabric, this more flexible and comfortable version of the jacket was to all intents and purposes the precursor of the present-day Moncler jacket, and heralded its success. Then there were the "paninari" - Consumer-oriented, apolitical young Italians who were interested in fashion, music and all the trends from the USA. The subculture dates back to the 1980s and had its center in Milan. Often they were spoiled children of rich parents, attended a private school - and wore in winter next to the obligatory Ray-Ban sunglasses a down jacket from Moncler. Of course there were other down jackets, but for the brand-conscious Jeunesse Dorée, Moncler was what you had to have. Chantal Thomass, a designer who worked with the company until 1989, overhauled the appearance of the quilted jacket and she replaced the zipper with buttons and used fur trim, satin, and reversible fabrics. In 2003, Moncler was bought out by the Italian entrepreneur Remo Ruffini, born in 1961 and from Como/IT, today's President and Creative Director of the company, who was to introduce the strategy of the global quilted jacket. Ruffini comes from a good home, his parents had each a small textile company. At age 14, the young Remo wore himself a Moncler, and today he says that he never thought that he would celebrate the 60th anniversary of the company as chief. The Italian - like so many successful entrepreneurs a school dropout - bought Moncler after he had built and sold a little clothing brand himself. The brand with the rooster and the French national colors in the logo then scored 90 percent of sales in Italy, but was otherwise asleep and therefore cheap to get. What Ruffini then got up with the label is a prime example of a highly successful marketing. Also in 2003, Moncler's turnover was a modest 45 million euros, in 2013 it's likely to be 570 million. In ten years, the company has increased its turnover by more than ten times, yet only 25 percent of sales are made in Italy, a third of it is made in Asia, another third in the rest of Europe. Moncler waived a production in the Far East and favors factories  in France, Italy, Bulgaria and Romania instead. What was the recipe for success? First, Ruffini has fetched the down jacket from the sports shops into their own mono-brand stores, thus securing control of the distribution. The jacket is still available in other stores, but the proportion of its meanwhile 122 own stores around the world is increasing daily. Because of this, how the Italian says, "filters have been eliminated". So to speak: Moncler finds a direct way to the clientele, the sovereignty over the image of the brand lies with the company - and yet no dealer margins have to be financed. This perfectly fits with Ruffini who is known as a perfectionist and control freak amongst companions. Second element of success is the positioning of the products in the luxury segment. Moncler has never been a cheap brand, but today, a quilted vest already costs CHF 740 francs. Jackets and coats of the top lines  Gamme Bleu and Gamme Rouge go for CHF 2000 or CHF 3000 and even more over the counter. Stars like actress Liz Hurley and the rapper Kanye West let themselves be photographed in Moncler jackets, and especially the shiny jackets are copied worldwide. Because the affair is going so well, Ruffini has expanded its collections. Today, there are in addition to the classic winter jackets all kinds of things in the area of prêt-à-porter, even handbags, suitcases or sunglasses are on offer. Just the whole program. Not to be missed: Glamour! The three-time Grammy Award winner Pharrell Williams, musician and songwriter, has recently designed an eyewear collection as a guest designer. On December 16th,  2013, Moncler was scheduled to have an IPO on the Milan Stock Exchange with an inital value of €10.20 per share. The shares were oversubscribed 31 times, which made the company valued at over €2 billion.
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Latest news:

11.09.2017 Boutique List updated 09.09.2017 2017 collection pages updated see Updates
© Monclerworld 2014, online since 29.01.2007
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The origins of the name are in an abbreviation of Monastier de Clermont, a village in the mountains near Grenoble. At the outset, Moncler produced quilted sleeping bags, a single model of a lined hood and tents with a telescope structure and outside cover. The first quilted jackets were conceived for protecting workers from the cold. They used the jackets on top of their overalls in the small mountain establishment. The first to note them and realize their potential was the French mountaineer Lionel Terray. The result saw the specialist range "Moncler pour Lionel Terray": quilted jackets, overalls, gloves, and high resistance sleeping bags. Extreme protection made them suitable for the harshest climates. All were put to the test in the course of expeditions and were gradually perfected. In 1954, Moncler quilted jackets were chosen to equip the Italian expedition to Karakorum, which culminated with the conquest of the earth's second highest summit by Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli. Moncler also accompanied the French expedition which reached the summit of Makalù in 1995 and was the official supplier for expeditions in Alaska organised by Lionel Terray in 1964. On occasion of the Grenoble Winter Olympics, Moncler became the official supplier of the French national downhill skiing team. It was a special event that was also to mark the change in logo: Mount Eguit, which rises up behind the village, was replaced by the rooster. It was the French national downhill skiing team itself that requested a variation on the quilted jacket: it was no longer to be the double version but a single garment that would be more manageable, light and well- suited to competition requirements. Initially called "Huascaran" and then "Nepal", with the addition of leather epaulettes for resting the skis on without damaging the fabric, this more flexible and comfortable version of the jacket was to all intents and purposes the precursor of the present-day Moncler jacket, and heralded its success. Then there were the "paninari" - Consumer-oriented, apolitical young Italians who were interested in fashion, music and all the trends from the USA. The subculture dates back to the 1980s and had its center in Milan. Often they were spoiled children of rich parents, attended a private school - and wore in winter next to the obligatory Ray-Ban sunglasses a down jacket from Moncler. Of course there were other down jackets, but for the brand-conscious Jeunesse Dorée, Moncler was what you had to have. Chantal Thomass, a designer who worked with the company until 1989, overhauled the appearance of the quilted jacket and she replaced the zipper with buttons and used fur trim, satin, and reversible fabrics. In 2003, Moncler was bought out by the Italian entrepreneur Remo Ruffini, born in 1961 and from Como/IT, today's President and Creative Director of the company, who was to introduce the strategy of the global quilted jacket. Ruffini comes from a good home, his parents had each a small textile company. At age 14, the young Remo wore himself a Moncler, and today he says that he never thought that he would celebrate the 60th anniversary of the company as chief. The Italian - like so many successful entrepreneurs a school dropout - bought Moncler after he had built and sold a little clothing brand himself. The brand with the rooster and the French national colors in the logo then scored 90 percent of sales in Italy, but was otherwise asleep and therefore cheap to get. What Ruffini then got up with the label is a prime example of a highly successful marketing. Also in 2003, Moncler's turnover was a modest 45 million euros, in 2013 it's likely to be 570 million. In ten years, the company has increased its turnover by more than ten times, yet only 25 percent of sales are made in Italy, a third of it is made in Asia, another third in the rest of Europe. Moncler waived a production in the Far East and favors factories  in France, Italy, Bulgaria and Romania instead. What was the recipe for success? First, Ruffini has fetched the down jacket from the sports shops into their own mono-brand stores, thus securing control of the distribution. The jacket is still available in other stores, but the proportion of its meanwhile 122 own stores around the world is increasing daily. Because of this, how the Italian says, "filters have been eliminated". So to speak: Moncler finds a direct way to the clientele, the sovereignty over the image of the brand lies with the company - and yet no dealer margins have to be financed. This perfectly fits with Ruffini who is known as a perfectionist and control freak amongst companions. Second element of success is the positioning of the products in the luxury segment. Moncler has never been a cheap brand, but today, a quilted vest already costs CHF 740 francs. Jackets and coats of the top lines  Gamme Bleu and Gamme Rouge go for CHF 2000 or CHF 3000 and even more over the counter. Stars like actress Liz Hurley and the rapper Kanye West let themselves be photographed in Moncler jackets, and especially the shiny jackets are copied worldwide. Because the affair is going so well, Ruffini has expanded its collections. Today, there are in addition to the classic winter jackets all kinds of things in the area of prêt-à-porter, even handbags, suitcases or sunglasses are on offer. Just the whole program. Not to be missed: Glamour! The three-time Grammy Award winner Pharrell Williams, musician and songwriter, has recently designed an eyewear collection as a guest designer. On December 16th,  2013, Moncler was scheduled to have an IPO on the Milan Stock Exchange with an inital value of €10.20 per share. The shares were oversubscribed 31 times, which made the company valued at over €2 billion.

Moncler - The Story

MonclerWorld.ch
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